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EU concerns over rubber in artificial pitches

A new study claims that the rubber infill used may contain toxic material that can lead to cancer

Concerns have been raised by the use of rubber infill in artificial pitches and the perceived health implications

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Sports & Parks

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24 February 2016 | 0

Artificial pitches have become extremely popular in Ireland and around the world because of the fact they can be used in most weather conditions and require less maintenance and up keep compared to traditional turf pitches. However concerns have been raised by the EU over the use of rubber infill in the construction of these pitches and believed health implications its presence may have on players.

This is not a new concern and has been a debate that has surrounded the pitches for a few years now. The latest concerns over the pitches come from a recent study from the US which links the rubber infill with cancer.

The new study claims that the rubber infill used may contain toxic material that can lead to cancer has called the practice in to question over fears for player’s safety. It is reported that the rubber used in the construction, which is made up from ground tires, contains chemicals called PAHs that are known to be highly carcinogenic.

The Irish Times reports A Yale professor of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Gaboury Benoit, as describing the use of shredded tyres as infill on the pitches as a ‘witches brew’ of toxic substances, adding that it seemed irresponsible to market hazardous waste as a consumer product. Now the use of the material is now under investigation by the EU as a material that should fall under restrictive legislation.

 

 

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